SciRev

(Studies in the Scientific Revolution)

Assignment 4: Due Thursday, 9/27/07


Exam Review Materials:

HarveyReview.pdf [2.2 MB]

 

Here is a collection of VesaliusÕ images from De Fabrica from 1543 (what a coincidence).

Vesalius_DeFabrica100.pdf [10.8 MB] – sorry it is so big, but the images donÕt look good otherwise.



Read this excerpt that overviews KeplerÕs astronomical career: McClellanDorn_KeplerExcerpt.pdf [1.5 MB]

 

Look at these parts of KeplerÕs Mysterium Cosmographicum [4.2 MB] (1596) in this PDF.  Really look at this stuff.  DonÕt skip the title page and all the fluff.  The fluff is as interesting as the meat of the book.

 

Look at over these extracts from KeplerÕs Harmonice mundi (1619).  Just look this stuff over and find some of the parts I identify. IÕll explain it further in class.  But I want you to see how he presents his three laws of planetary motion.  The first two were derived in Astronomia nova but are mentioned only once in this book.  The third law, the big deal from Harmonice mundi, doesnÕt even get its own chapter heading.  It is just something he figured out while working out the cosmic music.

 

-From Book II [H.m.LiberIIExcerptssm.pdf -1.7 MB] look the pretty pictures of geometric cutouts and drawings and read over the elemental characteristics of the Platonic solids on pp. 114-115.

 

-From Book III [LiberIIIExtract.pdf – 1.7 MB] look over p. 129 and look over the part on Pythagoras and his discovery of mathematical-musical consonance on pp. 131-134.

 

-From the final book, Book V [H.m.LiberVexcerptssm.pdf -2.5 MB] look at the following pages:

Read over the Table of contents on p. 393.  This is his ultimate agenda.

Notice on pp. 395-405 all of the references to ideas developed in Mysterium Cosmographicum.

Locate the 2nd and 3rd laws of planetary motion on p. 408.

Read the 3rd law at the bottom of p. 411.

Read KeplerÕs side bar on the music of the earth on p. 440.  Éa rather dismal worldview.

 

 

Read: Boas chapter IX: pp. 129-154 and 265-286 on circulation. 

 

Read chapters VIII-IX and XIII-XIV of HarveyÕs Anatomical Exercises on the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals (Exercitatio anatomica de motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus, often referred to simply as De motu cordis) published in 1628.

Harvey_DeMotuCordis.doc [708 KB] – this is a .doc and will download accordingly.

I personally think that this book has some of the most convincing arguments in the history of science.


Write: Choose from the followingÉ

 

            Option A: Write an essay of appropriate length that dissects and analyses chapters VIII-IX from the Harvey reading above.  Discuss quantification as a method of doing and proving scientific theory and extract his quantified data and make it more readable by making it into a chart, or graph, or table or similar format.  Diagrams such as cross sections of arteries or veins or cylindrical volumes or heart cavities may be useful.

           

            Option B: Write an essay of appropriate length that dissects and analyses chapters XIII-XIV.  Do as Harvey instructs and reproduce these demonstrations.  Draw them up or augment the illustrations from the reading or better yet, take photographs from your own arm or the arm of somebody willing to have you do this to them.  Discuss how valves make these arguments work and support a circulatory theory.

 

            Option C: Write an essay of appropriate length on a section from Kepler.

 

Feel free to riff on either of these options by using modern sources.  Why might I think that these arguments are convincing?  What makes them believable or unbelievable?  Feel free to disagree with me.  Being convinced by an argument is a personal experience and not subject to evaluation.

 

Souped-up essays could analyze more parts from the Harvey or Kepler and/or use some of the supplementary material from the citations below.  These souped-up essays should merge the sources into a coherent whole and not just be separate essay-ettes forced to live on the same page. 

 

 

Cite all sources.  Make it look good.  Production quality matters.



Citations

 

Boas, Marie. The Scientific Renaissance, 1450-1630. Vol. II The Rise of Modern Science, ed. A. Rupert Hall. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1962.

 

Gouk, Penelope. Music, Science, and Natural Magic in Seventeenth-Century England. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999.

 

Gouk, Penelope. "The Role of Harmonics in the Scientific Revolution." In The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory, ed. Thomas Street Christensen, pp. 223-245. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Gouk_HarmonicsInSciRev.pdf [2.6 MB]

 

Harvey, William. "On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals (De Motu Cordis)." In Scientific Papers; Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology, with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations, 91 pp. New York: P. F. Collier & son, Internet Edition from Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University, 1901, 1st Latin ed. from 1628.  Available online.

 

Jardine, Lisa. Ingenious Pursuits: Building the Scientific Revolution: Anchor Books, 2000. Excerpt on extensions of Harvy-esque techniques.  Jardin_IngeniousPursuitExcerpt.pdf [987 KB]

 

McClellan, James E., and Harold Dorn. Science and Technology in World History : An Introduction. Baltimore, Md.: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

 

Farber, Eduard. "The Color of Venous Blood." Isis 45, no. 1 (1954): pp. 3-9. Farber_ColorofBlood.pdf [211 KB]

 

Fleming, Donald. "Galen on the Motions of the Blood in the Heart and Lungs." Isis 46, no. 1 (1955): pp. 14-21. Fleming_GalenBloodmotioninheartlungs.pdf [289 KB]

 

________. "William Harvey and the Pulmonary Circulation." Isis 46, no. 4 (1955): pp. 319-327. Fleming_HarveyandPulmonaryCirculation.pdf [332 KB]

 

Gorham, Geoffrey. "Mind-Body Dualism and the Harvey-Descartes Controversy." Journal of the History of Ideas 55, no. 2 (1994): 211-234. Gorham_Mind-BodyHarvey-Descartes.pdf [796 KB]

 

Harvey, William. "On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals (De Motu Cordis)." In Scientific Papers; Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology, with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations, 91 pp. New York: P. F. Collier & son, Internet Edition from Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University, 1901, 1st Latin ed. from 1628. Harvey_DeMotuCordis.doc [708 KB]

 

Hill, Christopher. "William Harvey and the Idea of Monarchy." Past and Present 27 (1964): pp. 54-72. Hill_HarveyandMonarchy.pdf [506 KB]

 

________. "William Harvey (No Parliamentarian, No Heretic) and the Idea of Monarchy." Past and Present 31 (1965): pp. 97-103.  Hill_HarveyNoHereticMonarchy.pdf [185 KB]

 

Kepler, Johannes. The Harmony of the World (Harmonice Mundi). Translated by and commentary by E. J. Aiton, A. M. Duncan and J. V. Field. Philadelphia: The American Philosophical Society, 1997, first Latin ed. 1618.

 

Kepler, Johannes, and E. J. Aiton. The Secret of the Universe (Mysterium Cosmographicum). Translated by A.M. Duncan and with introduction and commentary by E.J. Aiton and a preface by I. Bernard Cohen. New York: Abaris Books, 1981.

 

Pagel, Walter. "William Harvey: Some Neglected Aspects of Medical History." Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 7 (1944): pp. 144-153. Pagel_HarveyNeglectedMedHistory.pdf [472 KB]

 

Plochmann, George Kimball. "William Harvey and His Methods." Studies in the Renaissance 10 (1963): 192-210.  Plochmann_HarveyandHisMethods.pdf [567 KB]

 

Servetus, Michael, and Angel Alcal‡. Restituci—n Del Cristianismo. Translated by Angel Alcala y Luis Betes Publicaciones De La Fundaci—n Universitaria Espa–ola. Cl‡sicos Olvidados ; 3. Madrid: Fundaci—n Universitaria Espa–ola, 1980.  Email me if you are interested.  (In Spanish)

 

Servetus, Michael, and Charles Donald O'Malley. Michael Servetus, a Translation of His Geographical, Medical, and Astrological Writings. Philadelphia,: American Philosophical Society, 1953.

 

Siraisi, Nancy G. "Some Current Trends in the Study of Renaissance Medicine." Renaissance Quarterly 37, no. 4 (1984): 585-600.  Siraisi_TrendsRenaissancemedicine.pdf  [446 KB]

 

Wilson, Luke. "William Harvey's Prelectiones: The Performance of the Body in the Renaissance Theater of Anatomy." Representations, no. 17 (1987): 62-95.  Wilson_HarveyBodyTheaterofAnatomy.pdf [1.2 MB]

 

McClellan, James E., and Harold Dorn. Science and Technology in World History : An Introduction. Baltimore, Md.: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

 

 


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