/var/folders/zs/wjj68cc10q31zxpg2r73xw200000gn/T/com.microsoft.Word/Content.MSO/BB6D55DF.tmp

SIR without Social Distancing

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SIR with Social Distancing gradually implemented

 

Mathematics 110

Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:30-2:50

Hegeman 308: Daniel Newsome Presiding

 

                         -Office: Learning Commons, Stone Row basement [map]

-Email: bardmath@mifami.org

         -Office Hours:  Mondays and Fridays from 3:00-4:00

                                                    ...or by appointment.

-Parent Webpage: http://www.mifami.org

 

 

Updated: 3/30/20 4:32 PM

 

Textbook: Precalculus by Collingwood, Prince, and Conroy. 

Open source text, dated June 19, 2019.

Link to PDF  

 

 

I've moved the first half of the assignments (the ones we have done already)

to a new page in order to clean up this page, which was getting cluttered.

The older (pre-virus) assignments are now here: First Half Assignments.

 

Updated 3/21/2020- The New Normal Page.  Read it over please.

 

Due

Date

Assignment

Extras-Options-Addenda

Mon.

 

8a

 

3/16

This class is moving online.  Everything will be orchestrated from this website.

See: The New Normal Page.

 

Ch9: Inverse Functions.  Read over this chapter.  It's actually pretty good.

 

Do these problems: 9.1a, 9.1b, 9.2a, 9.2b, 9.3, 9.5, 9.7a, and 9.9.

 

Turn in this problem: 9.7a:  Put both lines on the same graph and then draw in y = x.  Notice the symmetry across y = x. 

Turn this in electronically to: bardmath@mifami.org.

Inverse Functions:

Essentially you are doing this:

(x, y) to (y, x)

Solve for x instead of y.

The range of one is the domain of the other, and vice versa.

Graphically inverting y = x2

 

Ch9-Solutions

[not by best work]

 

Homework Email:

bardmath@mifami.org

 

Must Read: The New Normal Page

 

Wed.

 

8b

 

3/18

 

Update 3/21/2020:

I've moved this entire assignment to its own page for organizational reasons.  Here it is:

SIR Modeling- Materials and Assignment

This is the full assignment for 3/30 and 4/1.

 

Intro Video on Modeling an Epidemic:

WelcomeToRemotePreCalculus.m4v


I made a short video doing 9.7a.

It's here: 110-PreCalc

Use your Bard Google account for access.


Over Break Additional Materials:

RadioLab-Patient Zero- Excellent episode. Interesting use of sound and music.

Quammen-Malaria-Modeling- Describes the history of mathematical modeling (SIR model)


3/23

Spring Break- take a breath. 

The New Normal page has been updated with new information:

The New Normal Page

3/25

Spring Break - wash your hands

Mon.

 

3/30

 

9a

SIR Modeling- Materials and Assignment

This is the full assignment covering 3/18 to and 4/1.

[Same link as above in 3/18]

 

Zoom Class Video-3.30.20

Additional Materials:

RadioLab-Patient Zero- Excellent episode. Interesting use of sound and music.

 

Quammen-Malaria-Modeling- Describes the history of mathematical modeling (SIR model)

 

Optional:

NYTimes-Interesting Graphics- Virus on the Move- This is another approach to modeling the infection.

 

Flattening the Curve- NYT

 

Mandavilli-NYT-Can You Become Immune to the Coronavirus? - Finally, some news on immunity for the Recovered population.

 

4/1

 

9b

Finish up all the SIR assignments and turn them in.

Now, for something completely different...Black Holes

Overbye-Infinite Visions (PDF)

Black Holes: current overview

Video from Smithsonian

 

Mon.

 

10a

 

4/6

Ch10-11: Exponential Modeling

Tuning with Daniel: Video

 

Ch10-Solutions: coming soon...

 

Optional Digressions:

-The Jazz Kittens on Instagram

-Cool Jazz on Ice

Wed.

 

10b

 

4/8

Ch11: Exponential Modeling

Ch12a: Log Functions

Ch12b: Paper Folding Exercise

 

Mon.

 

11a

 

4/13

Ch13: 3 Construction Tools

 

Wed.

 

11b

 

4/15

Ch14: Rational Functions

 

TakeHome Quiz

 

Mon.

 

12a

 

4/20

Ch15: Measuring an Angle

 

Wed.

 

12b

 

4/22

Ch16: Circular Motion

 

Mon.

 

13a

 

4/27

Ch17a: Circular Functions and Deriving basic Trig. Functions

 

Wed.

 

13b

 

4/29

Ch17b: Angle Addition, Double, and Half Angle Derivations

 

Mon.

 

14a

 

5/4

Ch18: Trig

 

Wed.

 

14b

 

5/6

Ch19: Sinusoidal

 

Mon.

 

15a

 

5/11

Monday

Ch20: Inverse Circular

 

Wed.

 

15b

 

5/13

Wednesday

Review

 

Mon.

 

???

 

5/18

Monday

15a:  Exam

 

5/19

???

Tuesday

or... 15b:  Special Problems

 

 

Useful Graphing Calculator:  GeoGebra. 

[Geogebra Classic 5 can be downloaded and used offline.  Scroll down to download to a computer.]

You can also use Geogebra 6 online or as an app on a phone. 

 

Another popular one is desmos.  There is no offline version that I am aware of.


 

 

 


I'll be updating this information shortly...

Math Study Room - RKC 101 - Sun–Wed, 7:00–10:00

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Julia Sheffler

 

Jiangli Liu

Yuexin Ma, (Echo)

Riti Bahl

Riti Bahl temporarily

 

Felicia Flores

 

Yiyang Zhou

 

t.b.a.

The Math Study Room is a place where you can casually do your homework and have other students with math backgrounds help you when you need it. 

It is a great place to get the help you need without the pressure of a professor.


Description of Class

"A course for students who intend to take calculus and need to acquire the necessary skills in algebra and trigonometry. The concept of function is stressed, with particular attention given to linear, quadratic,  general polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.  Graphing in the Cartesian plane and developing the trigonometric  functions as circular functions are included."  -Course Catelogue

 

Expectations

Treat this class like a job.  Show up on time, do the expected work on time, don't ask for extensions, and don't make excuses.

If you cannot make it to class, email me [dnewsome@bard.edu] and let me know in advance.  I don't need to know why.

Obviously, emergencies and special situations may occur and these will be accomidated when appropriate. 

 

 

Grading

This class is mostly about participating and taking the homework seriously. 

The quizzes and exams are just coersive ways to make you take the homework seriously.

 

Grade breakdown: 

Homework: 50%

Participation: 25%

Quizzes and Exams:  25%

 

The homework is the most important part of this class.  There will be homework assigned for each class.  Only certain problems from the assigned homework will be turned in, so these problems need to be done like a short essay.  The problem needs to be restated or clearly paraphrased.  Diagrams (if useful) need to be drawn and drawn well.  Prose commentary needs to be written to guide the reader (me) through your thought process.  Interesting mathematical work needs to be shown.  If there is an equal sign, it had better be equal.  Answers need to be highlighted or circled or somehow made obvious.  Also, useful additional sources should be cited.  [If you use a Khan Academy video, provide a link.  If you use another textbook, cite it.  If you use the Math Study Room, say so.]  If you cannot solve the problem, you should figure out an estimate... an approximation... an educated guess... draw some diagrams and write that up as your homework.  Simply stating, "I couldn't figure it out," is not good enough.  Provide a range within which you expect to find the answer, even if you can't figure out how to set up the mathematics.  Most homework that you turn in will require multiple drafts.  I want to see the second (or third) draft, not the first.  Messy first drafts with only the calculations will not be given much credit.

And remember, in most of the homework problems most of the numbers will have units: 5 inches, 24 mph, 8C, -33%, etc.

Don't forget to identify the units and put them in there with the equations.  Units often cancel out, leaving you with a unit for the answer. If the units don't cancel out correctly, that's an excellent indication that something is wrong in your set-up. 

 

Participation includes attendance and promptness as well as traditional participatory activities like asking questions, volunteering to put something on the board, and laughing at my jokes. 

 

From my point of view Quizzes and Exams are the least important part of the course.  For whatever reason, students seem to place a great deal of importance on quizes and exams.  Perhaps it is a high school thing.  Perhaps students think that doing well on a test measures something above and beyond doing well on a test.  In any event, I give exams and quizes from time to time. It seems to be what everybody expects from a mathematics course.   The more you do the homework well, the fewer quizzes.